NOISE ENGINEERING DESIGN

When hearing protection and administrative controls cannot be employed to reduce noise exposures, EI’s engineering team assists our industrial clients in the identification and design of noise engineering controls.  Engineering controls for excessive noise can be developed for isolated pieces of manufacturing equipment or entire industrial process lines. Initial steps require performing sounds level facility surveys and personnel noise dosimeter monitoring of manufacturing personnel by experienced industrial hygienists. Noise monitoring results are utilized to determine specific sources of excessive noise, as well as the mechanism of sound generation/propagation emitted by the excessive noise source.  Multiple sources of noise will subsequently be “rank ordered”, which will allow for a range of possible engineering controls, typically addressing the loudest sound sources first.  EI’s professionals segregate excessive noise sources into two distinct classes, vibrational noise and noise turbulence.

Once all specific noise sources are identified, EI utilizes the following logical approach to determine the optimal systems to reduce/control excessive noise:

  1. Substitution of equipment (fundamental first step)
  2. Categorization of source into vibrational noise and turbulence-based noise
  3. Reduction of driving forces which cause excessive noise
    a. Decreasing machine speed
    b. Maintaining dynamic balance
    c. Provide vibrational isolation
    d. Increasing impact duration, while reducing the force of impact
  4. Reduce response of vibrating surfaces
  5. Reduce area of vibrating surfaces
  6. Reorienting directional noise sources
  7. Reduction in velocity of fluid flow (air ejection systems, valves, vents and piping)
  8. Provide sound absorption alternatives
  9. Design and installation of equipment and personnel noise enclosures

Let EI’s team of industrial hygienists and engineers work collaboratively to identify and provide cost-effective engineering solutions aimed at reducing exposure of your workforce to excessive noise.

IN NEED OF OUR SERVICES? 

EI’s commitment to service has been amply demonstrated on past projects.  Yet again, this commitment has been clearly demonstrated by nimble agility of short notice staff scheduling.  The dedicated professionals of The EI Group have exceeded our expectations.

 

Steven Pond, CPG

Associate, Schnabel Engineering

Learn First-Aid/CPR and Grow Your Confidence to Care

Learn First-Aid/CPR and Grow Your Confidence to Care

Statistics show you’re more likely to give first-aid to someone you know than a stranger. When minutes count, you’ll be the person to give the necessary aid to a family member or co-workers before Emergency Medical Services (EMS) arrive. Having the knowledge and skills to act can save or restore someone’s life and prevent you from wondering – what if?

What is a Regulatory File Review and Why Might I Need One?

What is a Regulatory File Review and Why Might I Need One?

A Regulatory File Review is required under ASTM Standard Practice (E 1527-13 [effective 11-13-13]) when the subject property or an adjoining property is noted in the Standard Environmental Records Sources during the course of a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA).  Conducting a Regulatory File Review involves the procurement of regulatory files from Federal, state, and/or local governing agencies for review by an Environmental Professional (EP). 

Why Do I Need a GPR Survey When I Have Documentation that USTs Have Been Removed?

Why Do I Need a GPR Survey When I Have Documentation that USTs Have Been Removed?

When you have a Closure Assessment Report (CAR) stating underground storage tanks (USTs) have been removed and that removal has been granted a No Further Action status from the state or other governing regulatory body, it might seem that nothing else is needed. While this is often the case, many times it is unknown if additional tanks remain on site; including tanks that pre-date the requirement for registration at the Federal and state levels in the 1980s.

January is all about Radon Awareness and Action

January is all about Radon Awareness and Action

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Radon Awareness Week is this week (January 24-28, 2022). Radon is a naturally occurring invisible, odorless, tasteless and radioactive gas, which when trapped in homes and buildings can build up causing occupant exposure. Prolonged exposure to elevated radon concentrations causes an increased risk of lung cancer.

Preparing Your Occupational COVID Testing Program. Are You Ready?

Preparing Your Occupational COVID Testing Program. Are You Ready?

Wherever business managers lean politically, most concur that routine workplace testing of employees to identify COVID carriers is an effective measure to minimize occupational COVID transmission. The virulent nature of the Omicron variant (akin to measles in virulence) makes rapid antigen testing of the workforce a common sense choice to prevent them from spreading COVID to coworkers. What better concept to identify those employees who are infected with COVID and isolate them from their fellow workers to “Nip occupational COVID transmission in the bud!?” 

Sustainability and ISO Management Systems: Are ISO Standards a Bunch of Hooey or a Helpful Sustainability Tool?

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In recent years market drivers have played a more pivotal role in convincing management to embrace a corporate sustainable culture. In fact, even without new regulations or legal requirements, 90% of major US companies published a sustainability report in 2019, up from 20% in 2011. Sustainability has become a means of gaining market visibility and differentiation. This shift in business is about drivers in the marketplace and not regulation. Sustainability efforts at your facility may be driven by the requirements of multi-national companies with headquarters in Europe or possibly the requirements of customers within your global supply chain.

Selling Corporate Sustainability to Management

Selling Corporate Sustainability to Management

Convincing employees and management to embrace corporate cultural change is certainly nothing new. One needs to look no farther than the successful business models which promote occupational safety, aimed at lowering workplace accidents! A successful occupational safety program requires a cultural change and encourages participation among the entire workforce. Just like safety, promoting a sustainable culture at work is simply good business and yields a significant, long-term ROI.

The Fundamentals of Confined Spaces

The Fundamentals of Confined Spaces

The Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) has implemented stringent regulations when identifying confined spaces in the workplace.  Such standards are due to the number of fatalities associated with occupying these spaces.  

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HEARING CONSERVATION

SAFETY ENGINEERING

NOISE MONITORING

TRAINING COURSES