Training Blog
Eliminating or Minimizing Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens in the Workplace

Eliminating or Minimizing Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens in the Workplace

It is estimated that 5.6 million or more workers are at risk for occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens.  OSHA requires employers provide training to any employee that has the potential to be exposed to bloodborne pathogens or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM). OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1030 (the standard) applies to all workers in the private sector, as well as civilian employees of Federal entities.

Learn First-Aid/CPR and Grow Your Confidence to Care

Learn First-Aid/CPR and Grow Your Confidence to Care

Statistics show you’re more likely to give first-aid to someone you know than a stranger. When minutes count, you’ll be the person to give the necessary aid to a family member or co-workers before Emergency Medical Services (EMS) arrive. Having the knowledge and skills to act can save or restore someone’s life and prevent you from wondering – what if?

Simply Put: First-Aid, CPR and AED Training Saves Lives

Simply Put: First-Aid, CPR and AED Training Saves Lives

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, according to the American Heart Association. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs when the heart stops beating and without immediate assistance, the person will ultimately die where they fell. SCA is far different than a person experiencing a heart attack. A person suffering a heart attack may have chest pain, trouble breathing, and become nauseated and sweaty. If these symptoms are recognized quickly and the person is treated in a hospital, statistics show that 90% of heart attack victims will survive.

Increased Risk: Workplace Violence in the Healthcare Industry

Increased Risk: Workplace Violence in the Healthcare Industry

Sadly, workplace violence continues to be reported in the news almost every day. While OSHA has no specific regulation addressing workplace violence, a recent court decision supports OSHA’s use of the General Duty Clause in workplace violence cases. OSHA has taken notice and is paying increasing attention to the violence issue, particularly in the healthcare industry.

EPA Proposes Lowering Dust-Lead Hazard Standards

EPA Proposes Lowering Dust-Lead Hazard Standards

On June 22, 2018, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a proposal to lower the dust-lead hazard standards for public comment.  The new proposed standards come in response to increased concerns of how little lead exposure is required to negatively impact the health of children

US Court Rules Give EPA a 90-day Extension to Update Lead Regulations

US Court Rules Give EPA a 90-day Extension to Update Lead Regulations

In December 2017, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had ninety days to update lead-based paint and lead-dust hazard standards, setting a deadline of March 27, 2018. On March 20, 2018 the EPA filed for a ninety-day extension, arguing the court failed to make its ruling final, thus not starting the countdown for the deadline.

Why Lead-Based Paint Still Matters And What You Can Do

Why Lead-Based Paint Still Matters And What You Can Do

While lead poisoning can occur as a result of exposure to everyday items (soil, toys, batteries, water, etc.), the primary source for lead in America remains lead-based paint. Poisoning can occur quickly, within hours, when significant levels of dust are created during home renovations. More often, it occurs over months or years as paint gradually deteriorates on walls and windows. Either way it takes its toll . . . particularly on children.

EPA Updates Lead Disclosure Booklet to Address Lead in Water

EPA Updates Lead Disclosure Booklet to Address Lead in Water

Last year, the EPA updated its “Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home” booklet to improve information on lead hazards faced by homeowners and tenants. Changes include more in-depth information on lead in drinking water and de-emphasis on paint, dust and soil as the most common sources of lead.

US Court Rules the EPA Must Update Lead-Based Paint Regulations

US Court Rules the EPA Must Update Lead-Based Paint Regulations

On December 27, 2017, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must issue a proposed rule within ninety days to update lead-based paint and lead-dust hazard standards. Additionally, the court ruled the EPA must promulgate the final rule within one year after the announcement of the proposed update.

North Carolina Governor Proclaims October 23rd as “Lead-Safe Renovators Day”

North Carolina Governor Proclaims October 23rd as “Lead-Safe Renovators Day”

In recognition of the National Lead Poisoning Awareness Week (October 22-28), North Carolina Governor, Roy Cooper, has proclaimed October 23, 2017, as “Lead-Safe Renovators Day,” recognizing those contractors that have received North Carolina Renovation, Repair and Painting certification and work to safeguard children’s health when performing renovations in housing and child-occupied facilities built before 1978.

A Recent Discussion Regarding the Use of Arc Flash Tables

A Recent Discussion Regarding the Use of Arc Flash Tables

Just the other day I was speaking with another arc flash professional and the question was asked, “Why does the NFPA 70E allow for companies to use the tables, knowing that some companies cannot guarantee they meet the parameters laid out in the tables?”

RECENT POSTS

Eliminating or Minimizing Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens in the Workplace

It is estimated that 5.6 million or more workers are at risk for occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens.  OSHA requires employers provide training to any employee that has the potential to be exposed to bloodborne pathogens or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM). OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1030 (the standard) applies to all workers in the private sector, as well as civilian employees of Federal entities.

read more

Learn First-Aid/CPR and Grow Your Confidence to Care

Statistics show you’re more likely to give first-aid to someone you know than a stranger. When minutes count, you’ll be the person to give the necessary aid to a family member or co-workers before Emergency Medical Services (EMS) arrive. Having the knowledge and skills to act can save or restore someone’s life and prevent you from wondering – what if?

read more

Simply Put: First-Aid, CPR and AED Training Saves Lives

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, according to the American Heart Association. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs when the heart stops beating and without immediate assistance, the person will ultimately die where they fell. SCA is far different than a person experiencing a heart attack. A person suffering a heart attack may have chest pain, trouble breathing, and become nauseated and sweaty. If these symptoms are recognized quickly and the person is treated in a hospital, statistics show that 90% of heart attack victims will survive.

read more

EPA Proposes Lowering Dust-Lead Hazard Standards

On June 22, 2018, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a proposal to lower the dust-lead hazard standards for public comment.  The new proposed standards come in response to increased concerns of how little lead exposure is required to negatively impact the health of children

read more

US Court Rules Give EPA a 90-day Extension to Update Lead Regulations

In December 2017, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had ninety days to update lead-based paint and lead-dust hazard standards, setting a deadline of March 27, 2018. On March 20, 2018 the EPA filed for a ninety-day extension, arguing the court failed to make its ruling final, thus not starting the countdown for the deadline.

read more

Why Lead-Based Paint Still Matters And What You Can Do

While lead poisoning can occur as a result of exposure to everyday items (soil, toys, batteries, water, etc.), the primary source for lead in America remains lead-based paint. Poisoning can occur quickly, within hours, when significant levels of dust are created during home renovations. More often, it occurs over months or years as paint gradually deteriorates on walls and windows. Either way it takes its toll . . . particularly on children.

read more

EPA Updates Lead Disclosure Booklet to Address Lead in Water

Last year, the EPA updated its “Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home” booklet to improve information on lead hazards faced by homeowners and tenants. Changes include more in-depth information on lead in drinking water and de-emphasis on paint, dust and soil as the most common sources of lead.

read more

US Court Rules the EPA Must Update Lead-Based Paint Regulations

On December 27, 2017, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must issue a proposed rule within ninety days to update lead-based paint and lead-dust hazard standards. Additionally, the court ruled the EPA must promulgate the final rule within one year after the announcement of the proposed update.

read more

North Carolina Governor Proclaims October 23rd as “Lead-Safe Renovators Day”

In recognition of the National Lead Poisoning Awareness Week (October 22-28), North Carolina Governor, Roy Cooper, has proclaimed October 23, 2017, as “Lead-Safe Renovators Day,” recognizing those contractors that have received North Carolina Renovation, Repair and Painting certification and work to safeguard children’s health when performing renovations in housing and child-occupied facilities built before 1978.

read more

AIHA Warns Property Owners Over Mold After Hurricane Season

The American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) issued a mold warning for property owners in areas affected by this year’s hurricane season. With heavy rains followed by humidity, AIHA cautions a mold epidemic could be brewing across the southern and eastern United States.

read more

No Matter What You Call It: IAQ (or IEQ) Cannot be Avoided

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has been an issue for literally hundreds of years. In fact, Ben Franklin was an early air quality expert. Franklin once wrote, “I am persuaded that no common air from without is so unwholesome as the air in a closed room that has been often breathed and not exchanged.”

read more